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Max Boot’s “A Lesson in Our Backwardness” + O Canada! & Doonbeg Update

Charles Krause 4 months ago

Who is Max Boot anyway?

swamp report

swamp

Requiem for America


“A LESSON IN OUR BACKWARDNESS”
IS THE TITLE OF MAX BOOT’S
COLUMN IN THE PRINT EDITION OF
THURSDAY’S WASHINGTON POST.
IT’S A MUST-READ.

BOOT ALL BUT PREDICTS WE’RE
HEADED FOR A MAJOR CATASTROPHE.
BUT IT’S WHO HE IS AND WHAT HE SAYS
ABOUT OUR FAILURE TO ANTICIPATE
—AND INABILITY TO MITIGATE—
THE PANDEMIC THAT
MAKES THIS PIECE SO IMPORTANT.

“We should not be especially surprised by our failure at pandemic-fighting, because if we are being honest with ourselves, we would have to admit that the United States has long been failing.”

“We lag in almost every measure of societal well-being among the wealthy nations (now 36)… As of 2016, we had the second-highest poverty rate, the highest level of income inequality and the highest level of obesity…One area where we do lead is gun violence. Our homicide rate is nearly 50 percent above the OECD average.”

“The coronavirus failure should be a wake-up call that Trump has not made America great again. Quite the opposite: he has accelerated our decline. We must not only beat this pandemic, we must also address a host of other ills that have been festering for decades. In recent years, America has been ‘exceptional’ mainly in the scale of our governmental failures compared with those of other industrialized democracies.”

–Max Boot

READ THE COLUMN


Max Boot is a Russian-born, US-educated foreign policy and national security expert and scholar – journalist. He is currently a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York and a Republican who served as a senior foreign policy adviser to GOP Presidential candidates John McCain, Mitt Romney and Marco Rubio. The Carnegie Corporation named him one of the country’s “Great Immigrants” in 2019 and the Forward named him one of the country’s 50 most influential Jewish Americans in 2018.


Doonbeg Update

doonbeg

Golf, anyone?


Trump Doonbeg available beginning April 3

When asked about his hotels today and whether they would accept corporate welfare from the Treasury, Our Leader professed not to know anything about what financial assistance was being discussed or might be offered to hoteliers like himself. Of course, not. He also claimed not to know which of his hotels are open, and which are closed.

As a public service, we thought we’d find out.

According to Booking.com, the Trump National Doral Golf Resort Miami is sold out from tonight through the 4th of April. That probably means the golf resort is closed until further notice. But why not say so and present yourself as a model of good behavior when you can lie about it and pretend everything is Fabulous?

The Trump Doonbeg, on the other hand, in County Clare, Ireland, is selling rooms beginning April 3rd for $262 a night, a real bargain. On Sunday, the 5th, the rate goes up to $700 a night, which must be when they think the crisis will be over. Do they know something we don’t? Or are they pandering to the owner’s wild imagination?


O Canada!

canada

THE DETROIT-WINDSOR TUNNEL FRIDAY NIGHT. BORDER TO BE CLOSED TO NONESSENTIAL TRAFFIC TONIGHT.

Swamp Analytica


The value of friends and allies

U.S.-CANADA BORDER CLOSES TONIGHT!
PAYBACK FOR OUR LEADER’S
‘AMERICA FIRST’ POLICY?

WASHINGTON (Special to The Swamp Report)–The Canadian embassy is the embassy closest to the U.S. Capitol and the only one on the Presidential parade route from the Capitol to the White House. The view from the ambassador’s private dining room, high above Pennsylvania Avenue, is breathtaking and the embassy’s choice location is more than a coincidence.

It represents Canada’s traditional importance to the United States as a trading partner, good neighbor and ally; for the Canadians, the magnificent embassy they built on the site represents their recognition of the geographic, economic and cultural ties that bind the two nations together.

At the same time, it’s an unequal relationship which the U.S. sometimes takes for granted. It also, on occasion, makes Canada an easy target. That’s when their proximity works against them, as it has since You-Know-Who became president.

A hundred crises ago, Canada was one of the first U.S. allies to feel the sting of Our Leader’s ‘America First’ policy, when he insisted on renegotiating NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement between Canada, Mexico and the United States. And Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, was one of the first world leaders Our Leader picked a fight with, soon after he took office.

But what could the Canadians do?

I think we just found out.

Reading between the lines and connecting the dots, Canada was a little too agreeable this week when, by “mutual agreement,” it agreed to close its 5,500-mile-long border with the U.S. to “nonessential traffic.”

When the order takes effect tonight at midnight, trade between the two countries, in the form of trains and heavy trucks, will continue. But for the first time since 9/11, the longest land border in the world will be closed to the more than 1 million Canadians and Americans who cross every week.

It’s not difficult to see why closing the border is to Canada’s advantage; less so, to ours.

With a national health care system and universal health insurance; only about 1,300 coronavirus cases reported as of tonight, compared to more than 21,000 in the United States; and with the original epicenter of the U.S. crisis in Seattle, just 143 miles south of Vancouver, Canada’s third-largest city, the Canadian government must have worried that large numbers of Americans might well decide to seek temporary safety by moving North.

Ottawa might also have worried that American hospitals in cities along the border, likely to be overwhelmed with coronavirus patients this week or next, might ask for help from Canadian hospitals just two or three miles away (the distance between Detroit and Windsor, Ontario, for example).

Had Our Leader been on better terms with Trudeau, Canada might have kept the border open to “nonessential traffic” in order to help.

But with the chaos at the White House, the two leaders’ rocky relationship and the prospect of the virus infecting millions of Americans due to the Trump Administration’s failure to prepare the U.S. for it, Trudeau might well have decided this was no time to argue with Trump’s America First policy.

What goes around, comes around, he could be pardoned for thinking.

So, it seems, he decided Canada would adopt a Canada First policy, all of its own.

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